Sunday, October 22, 2017

The Becomingness of God: Jonathan Edwards’s Metaphysics (Part III of IV)

The Becomingness of God: Jonathan Edwards’s Metaphysics (Part III of IV)

February 17, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Rev. John J. Bombaro
In the first two installments of this series, Rev. Bombaro discussed the theocentric metaphysics and aesthetics of Jonathan Edwards, one of colonial America's greatest preachers and scholars. Here, Bombaro juxtaposes the language of dispositions that Edwards uses to describe God with its Scholastic philosophical heritage, reminding us of Edwards's peculiar vantage point at the cusp of modernity.
Divine Comprehensiveness and Edwardsean Panentheism: The Formulation of Jonathan Edwards’s Theocentric Metaphysics (Part II of IV)

Divine Comprehensiveness and Edwardsean Panentheism: The Formulation of Jonathan Edwards’s Theocentric Metaphysics (Part II of IV)

December 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

John J. Bombaro
Scholar and minister in colonial New England, driving force of the First Great Awakening, and finally president of Princeton University, Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758) was one of early America's most important intellectuals. In this second of four articles, Rev. John J. Bombaro takes us beyond the sermons and into a deep metaphysical panentheism and shows us how, in Edwards's theology, it is in God that we live and move and have our being.
The Hook of Truth

The Hook of Truth

January 26, 2010 by · 1 Comment 

Gerard Kreijen A review of Edmund Campion: A Life by Evelyn Waugh (Ignatius Press, 2005 [First published by Longmans, 1935]) That the undisputed master of dark humor and satire should have produced what is arguably the most compelling short biography of a saint to date is perhaps even more extraordinary than the claim that, today, both the biography and its author deserve close attention. Indeed, few means serve better to confront the hollow relativism of our age than turning to the conversion of Evelyn Waugh (1903-1966) and the life of Edmund Campion (1540-1581), the saintly subject of his 1935 book.