Wednesday, October 18, 2017

<b>The Stations of the Cross</b>

The Stations of the Cross

March 23, 2017 by · 2 Comments 

James Matthew Wilson and Daniel Mitsui

In this fourteen-part cycle, Wilson meditates on the mystery of the Cross and the way that leads to it. As the cycle unfolds, mundane time is caught up in the divine economy and drawn, step by step, to the summit of "Skull Hill". Paired with each poem is a beautiful, hand-drawn Station by artist Daniel Mitsui, whose work is a faithful participation in the tradition of Christian iconography as a sacred discipline and an act of prayer, in a revivified Western idiom. It is an honor to present the work of these two contemporary practitioners of classical arts alongside each other.

<b>‘Stillness in Rhythm’: Hesychastic Poiesis</b>

‘Stillness in Rhythm’: Hesychastic Poiesis

January 11, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Michael Centore

“Have mercy on me, a poet!” To many, the vocations of the poet and the monk seem incompatible. The young Thomas Merton, having had a taste of each, considered the former immanent, worldly, and vain, whereas the latter was “transcendent”, sacred, concerned with the “reality of God”. But there are many poets, even of a secular cast, whose ethos bears striking similarities to the ancient mystical practice of hesychia, or stillness. If these similarities are more than coincidental, why are there so few hesychast-poets? Could there be such a thing as a deliberate hesychastic poetics? If so, what would its praxis look like? If not, is that all the worse for poetry, or for monasticism?

<b>What’s become of the peanut-eyed snowman?</b>

What’s become of the peanut-eyed snowman?

August 9, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Alessio Zanelli

The sights, textures, scents and sounds of the world we encounter as children become parts of us, pegs on which memories are hung for a while – before they quietly fade and are lost. In this poem, at a familiar schoolyard after a lifetime away, they surface once more...

<b>Plato</b>

Plato

July 15, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Sir Henry James Sumner Maine

Today, Sir Henry is remembered as one of the nineteenth century's most important legal historians: his conception of contractual association as the distinguishing mark of Modernity remains an instructive lens through which to reflect on who we are and where we come from. But, at least in his undergraduate days at Pembroke College, Cambridge, he also proved himself to be both a poet and a Platonist of sorts; and one result was this tribute to the Master, which he submitted in 1843 in an (alas, unsuccessful) bid for the Chancellor's English Medal.

<b>Calamity Again</b>

Calamity Again

June 7, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Taras Shevchenko

The Ukrainians' ongoing struggle to save their troubled, post-Soviet civil society and to defend their sovereign land against Russian aggression has deep roots: although possessed of a national identity for centuries, they have enjoyed only few and fleeting periods of independence. In this brief but poignant poem, one of their greatest bards gives voice to his grief at yet another outbreak of violence in his beloved homeland.

<b>The Polish Ideal</b>

The Polish Ideal

May 6, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

G.K. Chesterton

In the 1790s, the once-great Polish Commonwealth had been carved up by the neighboring empires of Prussia, Austria, and Russia. But, in spite of the long century of repression that followed – a time when Siberia was known as the "Polish Golgotha" – the Poles' chivalric spirit and love of their homeland survived. In the 1920s, shortly after the victory of the newly independent Republic of Poland over Lenin's expansionist Soviet Union, G.K. Chesterton himself travelled to the country. And, filled as ever with the joy of discovering truths at the bottom of apparent paradoxes, he found poetry in their cavalry.