Sunday, July 22, 2018

<b>On Teaching</b>

On Teaching

June 17, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

by Wilfred M. McClay
There are many things that the world doesn’t understand about teaching. One of them is this: teachers themselves rarely have the occasion to step back and reflect on the meaning of what it is they’re doing. What is teaching, after all? Why should anyone do it? What is the point of education in general? How should we go about it? Here Prof. McClay considers just these questions, drawing on the classical tradition and on years of his own teaching experience to reflect on the nature, aims, and means of educating.

<b>Unity and Diversity in the University Curriculum</b>

Unity and Diversity in the University Curriculum

July 17, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Jonathan Rowland

What can I get at college that I can't find on Wikipedia? How does it all fit together? What is the purpose of education? Students today enjoy unprecedented freedom of choice when it comes to their academic formations. But their universities are often ill-equipped to help them answer the questions that inevitably shape this freedom, in part due to a general uncertainty about what sort of unity, if any, exists across the various forms of knowledge. Jonathan Rowland considers how today's academic institutions might address this doubt and its consequences by drawing on the more lasting of John Henry Newman's insights into the nature of the university.

The Moral Imagination

The Moral Imagination

November 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Russell Kirk
For decades now, mainstream educators have been encouraging their pupils to use their imaginations - even as the literary fare they've been offering has increasingly had the opposite effect. Russell Kirk brings his characteristic perspicacity to bear on the question of literature and the "moral imagination" in a classic essay that has only grown more relevant since it first appeared in 1981.