Thursday, July 28, 2016

<p>The Prince and the Polis</p><pre></pre><i>A Conversation with Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein</i>

The Prince and the Polis

A Conversation with Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein

May 18, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Clarion Review Founding Editor Jonathan Price and philosopher Nathaniel Helms sat down with His Serene Highness Hans-Adam II, Prince of Liechtenstein at the Oxford Union to discuss localism, centralisation, and his hopes for democracy in the third millennium.
<b>Concert at Sunrise House</b>

Concert at Sunrise House

May 2, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Len Krisak

The men and women who came of age during the 1930s and 1940s — if they survived them — lived through some of the most spectacular and cataclysmic upheavals that human history has known. In this new poem, Len Krisak offers us a glimpse of their sunset years, a quiet tribute tinged with aching at the passage of time, the changing of the guard, and the frailty of the bond that joins the generations.

<b>A Space of Forbearance</b><pre></pre><i>Ethnicity and Architecture on the Danube River Delta</i>

A Space of Forbearance
Ethnicity and Architecture on the Danube River Delta

April 10, 2016 by · 1 Comment 

Augustin Ioan

On the northwest coast of the Black Sea, beyond even where the Emperor Augustus banished Ovid, lies the Romanian town of Tulcea. Like many Romanian cities, it was a focal point for the confluence of a dizzying array of cultures: Slavic, Latin, Greek, Turkish, Jewish, Tatar, Armenian, and more. And, like cities everywhere, its social fabric was reflected and transmitted in its built environment. It was a remembered past and a lived present in stone and wood. Thirty years after the fall of the regime that “systematized” its urban core, one of the country's leading architects reflects on the cityscape that shaped his childhood in Tulcea and offers quiet hope for its future.

<b>The Resurrection of the Body</b>

The Resurrection of the Body

March 27, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

John Henry Newman

The Christian religion has at its center the Resurrection of the Christ, without which, St. Paul says, the faith is in vain, and through which we, too, are to rise. To what sort of life? It is not that of an abstracted, disembodied spirit, but that of an entire person, body and soul, whole again, and transfigured. In this sermon from his days as Vicar of St. Mary's, Oxford, preaching to a society drawn to materialism on the one hand and 'angelism' on the other, John Henry Newman meditates on Christ's invocation of the burning bush as a sign that we – our bodies included – "die but to appearance", a sign of the incarnate eternity that awaits us on the far side of the grave.

<b>The Stations of the Cross</b>

The Stations of the Cross

March 25, 2016 by · 2 Comments 

James Matthew Wilson and Daniel Mitsui

In this fourteen-part cycle, which is being released serially, Wilson meditates on the mystery of the Cross and the way that leads to it. As the cycle unfolds, mundane time is caught up in the divine economy and drawn, step by step, to the summit of "Skull Hill". Paired with each poem is a beautiful, hand-drawn Station by artist Daniel Mitsui, whose work is a faithful participation in the tradition of Christian iconography as a sacred discipline and an act of prayer, in a revivified Western idiom. It is an honor to present the work of these two contemporary practitioners of classical arts alongside each other.

<b>If Love Has Won, Has Marriage Lost? <br>An Orthodox Response to <i>Obergefell v. Hodges</i></b>

If Love Has Won, Has Marriage Lost?
An Orthodox Response to Obergefell v. Hodges

March 6, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Vigen Guroian

Last summer, the United States Supreme Court ruled that marriage is a constitutional right for all citizens, and that laws banning same-sex marriage are unconstitutional. What does this mean for the Church? Orthodox theologian Vigen Guroian argues for a rediscovery of the centrality of the Eucharist in Christian matrimony – and for the Church's immediate disengagement from the civil marriage business.

<b>What’s become of the peanut-eyed snowman?</b>

What’s become of the peanut-eyed snowman?

August 9, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Alessio Zanelli

The sights, textures, scents and sounds of the world we encounter as children become parts of us, pegs on which memories are hung for a while – before they quietly fade and are lost. In this poem, at a familiar schoolyard after a lifetime away, they surface once more...

<b>Plato</b>

Plato

July 15, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Sir Henry James Sumner Maine

Today, Sir Henry is remembered as one of the nineteenth century's most important legal historians: his conception of contractual association as the distinguishing mark of Modernity remains an instructive lens through which to reflect on who we are and where we come from. But, at least in his undergraduate days at Pembroke College, Cambridge, he also proved himself to be both a poet and a Platonist of sorts; and one result was this tribute to the Master, which he submitted in 1843 in an (alas, unsuccessful) bid for the Chancellor's English Medal.

<b>Calamity Again</b>

Calamity Again

June 7, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Taras Shevchenko

The Ukrainians' ongoing struggle to save their troubled, post-Soviet civil society and to defend their sovereign land against Russian aggression has deep roots: although possessed of a national identity for centuries, they have enjoyed only few and fleeting periods of independence. In this brief but poignant poem, one of their greatest bards gives voice to his grief at yet another outbreak of violence in his beloved homeland.

<b>The Polish Ideal</b>

The Polish Ideal

May 6, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

G.K. Chesterton

In the 1790s, the once-great Polish Commonwealth had been carved up by the neighboring empires of Prussia, Austria, and Russia. But, in spite of the long century of repression that followed – a time when Siberia was known as the "Polish Golgotha" – the Poles' chivalric spirit and love of their homeland survived. In the 1920s, shortly after the victory of the newly independent Republic of Poland over Lenin's expansionist Soviet Union, G.K. Chesterton himself travelled to the country. And, filled as ever with the joy of discovering truths at the bottom of apparent paradoxes, he found poetry in their cavalry.

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