Monday, October 23, 2017

Homo Economus Christianus

Homo Economus Christianus

October 29, 2009

Bart Flueren A review of Allan C. Carlson's Third Ways. Question: What do the author of The Journal of My Brother Alexei to the Land of Peasant Utopia, the corporation of Swedish Socialist Housewives, the Dutch Christian Democratic movement, Hillaire Belloc, and G.K. Chesterton all have in common? Third ways, apparently. Third ways, apparently. In his book bearing the same title, Allan C. Carlson sketches various movements in twentieth century Europe that—based on Christian values, the appreciation of the family, and agrarian forms of life—provided a way out of the false dichotomy between state-dominated socialism and laissez-faire capitalism.
Francis Collins: Deciphering God’s Language or Conquering Abundance?

Francis Collins: Deciphering God’s Language or Conquering Abundance?

October 29, 2009

Stephen Gatlin A review of Francis S. Collins's The Language of God. The reference to the late Paul Feyerabend is clear immediately, and willfully. I speak of a tale of abstraction. God may be an artist, not a scientist at all. The "language" might be an "evil demon". Not a bad thought, even if Descartes is a bad example! First, Francis Collins is a nice guy, a sincere evangelical Christian in thundering contradistinction to his predecessor as the head of the Human Genome Project (HGP), James Watson. Collins is also a fine scientist. Who could not like a guy who rides a motorcycle and plays the guitar? But in The Language of God, Francis Collins is out of his depth.
The Iconographic Fiction and Christian Humanism of Flannery O’Connor

The Iconographic Fiction and Christian Humanism of Flannery O’Connor

October 29, 2009

Vigen Guroian
“What the word says, the image shows silently; what we have heard, we have seen.” That is how the Seventh Great Ecumenical Council, held at Constantinople in 787, summarized its defense of the use of icons in Christian worship. What the council confessed to have heard from scripture and to believe, is that God became man in Jesus Christ. According to the Gospel of John “the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:13–14). Through an act of unfathomable kenosis, the infinite had become finite, the uncircumscribable was circumscribed in a human being, and the invisible was made visible.
River of Life

River of Life

October 29, 2009

Pearl Mary Wilshaw Threads of being waver in the breeze, Cells weave energy into a murmuring stream...
Weight on Lilies

Weight on Lilies

October 29, 2009

T. L. Reed Enid Brigham moved to Rumney as a bride of seventeen, back when New Hampshire had a lumber industry. She’d been through two husbands there, one bad and one good, but for sixty years she’d kept her little Cape looking like somebody cared. For the first decade, her waking hours were mostly drowned in the scream of the big blade down in the hollow behind the barn. The mill went bust, though, not long after her first husband lurched dead-drunk into the rig – “fell apart,” Enid often said, “more’n he done already.”
A Mass Killing for Love

A Mass Killing for Love

October 29, 2009

Josh Smith Maybe I’m being melodramatic, but I really would kill for you...
Series On An Unnamed Protagonist

Series On An Unnamed Protagonist

October 29, 2009

Daniel Klotz You belch up the acid taste of the toaster oven pizza...
“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

October 29, 2009

Interview and translation by Diederik Boomsma & Yoram Stein

We interview the French intellectual Rémi Brague about his life and work. The question of whether and in what way the West is unique figures centrally in our discussion. Whether one can sensibly speak of “three religions of the book”, whether Brague is a Straussian, what the civilisational roles of poverty, humility, and cultural inferiority complexes may be, and whether Americans really are cultural cowboys, are also each discussed in turn.

Comfort

Comfort

October 29, 2009

Valerie Hall
I keep in the stead of your eyes and hand’s intensity A meager consolation: that in living I am speaking...
Aging, Individualism and Our Middle-Class Dreams

Aging, Individualism and Our Middle-Class Dreams

October 29, 2009

Peter Augustine Lawler

 

According to many experts, American society is on the threshold of a crisis in long-term care. People are living longer and longer, but often at the price of living with severe infirmities—bodily or mental—that render them incapable of taking care of themselves for extended periods of old age. At the same time, fewer and fewer people are available and able to care for them.

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