Wednesday, April 23, 2014

New at Clarion

Featured

Bad Math and Poor Eyesight: Reconfiguring Dante’s Hellscape

Bad Math and Poor Eyesight: Reconfiguring Dante’s Hellscape

March 31, 2014  

by Arnaud Zimmern

Dante’s imagery in the Inferno is haunting. But, for all the care he took in crafting his canti, recent scholarship has revealed errors of scale and proportion in his descriptions of the infernal environs. Was he just a lousy arithmetician? Was he deliberately undermining his narrative with a bit of ironic miscalculation? Or are Dante’s apparent mistakes in fact occasions for him to explore a fundamental question about man’s redemption?

Articles / Essays

In Distrust of Movements

In Distrust of Movements

March 7, 2014  

Wendell Berry

The legions of health-food shoppers and the interminable discussions of sustainability bear witness to what is by now a well-established feature of our cultural landscape: the organic movement. But Wendell Berry, one of the most influential champions of the cause, turns his pen (and his plow) against the seductive idea that what is properly a way of being can be re-branded and shrink-wrapped into a movement.

Interviews

“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

October 29, 2009  

Interview and translation by Diederik Boomsma & Yoram Stein

We interview the French intellectual Rémi Brague, about his life and work. The question of whether and in what way the West is unique forms a large part of the interview. Whether one can sensibly speak of “three religions of the book”, whether Brague is a Straussian, what the civilizational role of poverty, humility, and cultural inferiority complexes are, and whether Americans really are cultural cowboys, each get discussed in turn.

Book Reviews

‘I Make All Things New’: Reflections on Time in <i>The Brothers Karamazov</i>

‘I Make All Things New’: Reflections on Time in The Brothers Karamazov

November 23, 2013  

Samuel McClelland

Our poems, songs, and tales give us a sense that there is continuity in history and that we fit into it. But what sort of continuity? And what, if anything, should we do about it? In The Brothers Karamazov, Dostoevsky grapples with some of the most compelling meta-narratives that have ever shaped our experience of life as temporal beings.

Poetry

Whisper

Whisper

January 26, 2010  

Jeffrey Bilbro

 

A parody of Allen Ginsberg’s Howl. In “Whisper” Mr. Bilbro breaks down some of the feelings of and about Generation ME. A thought-provoking piece that should be required reading in all freshman English classes.

Fiction

A Dove Descending: Part III of III

A Dove Descending: Part III of III

January 8, 2013  

Roger Scruton

The Clarion Review is proud to present the third and final installment of this novella by writer and philosopher Roger Scruton.

Zoë’s dreams of meeting her destiny on the streets of London are running aground fast. To whom will she turn? To Dr Leacock, the predatory postmodern professor who’s always too ready to help? To Michael, the mysterious art student, who surely pours his angst into something worth living for? Back to her mother, whom she disgraced by her flight, and whom she still resents? Zoë takes her stand; will the world turn with her?

Featured Essays

In Distrust of Movements

In Distrust of Movements

Wendell Berry

The legions of health-food shoppers and the interminable discussions of sustainability bear witness to what is by now a well-established feature of our cultural landscape: the organic movement. But Wendell Berry, one of the most influential champions of the cause, turns his pen (and his plow) against the seductive idea that what is properly a way of being can be re-branded and shrink-wrapped into a movement.


The Becomingness of God: Jonathan Edwards’s Metaphysics (Part III of IV)

The Becomingness of God: Jonathan Edwards’s Metaphysics (Part III of IV)

Rev. John J. Bombaro

In the first two installments of this series, Rev. Bombaro discussed the theocentric metaphysics and aesthetics of Jonathan Edwards, one of colonial America’s greatest preachers and scholars. Here, Bombaro juxtaposes the language of dispositions that Edwards uses to describe God with its Scholastic philosophical heritage, reminding us of Edwards’s peculiar vantage point at the cusp of modernity.


Literature and the Contract of Eternal Society

Literature and the Contract of Eternal Society

Russell Kirk

As a young man Russell Kirk traipsed over the braes of East Ayrshire, Scotland, to a tiny village with a rich history. Known to Dr. Johnson as the residence of his friend Boswell’s family, the place had, by Kirk’s time, little left of its former vitality. Worse, few seemed to care: there was a new cinema a few towns over, and that was, well, new, if nothing else. In this essay from 1969, Kirk argues that community decline cannot be understood – let alone reversed – without participation in the ever-threatened tradition of literary continuity.


Read more...

Featured Poetry

Whisper

Whisper

Jeffrey Bilbro

 

A parody of Allen Ginsberg’s Howl. In “Whisper” Mr. Bilbro breaks down some of the feelings of and about Generation ME. A thought-provoking piece that should be required reading in all freshman English classes.


Following the Ancients

Following the Ancients

Pamela Pignataro

 

The world did not start when you were born, so let the paths of the ancients lead you through your life.


Ode to a Cemetery on All Souls Day

Ode to a Cemetery on All Souls Day

Kenneth DiMaggio

Halloween
Was for the rest
of America…


Destroyed Vintage

Destroyed Vintage

Sam Pierstorff

 

Satire at its best. This poem takes on the mannequin at your local mall and the corporation that tells him what to wear.


Read more...

From the Archives

“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

Interview and translation by Diederik Boomsma & Yoram Stein

We interview the French intellectual Rémi Brague, about his life and work. The question of whether and in what way the West is unique forms a large part of the interview. Whether one can sensibly speak of “three religions of the book”, whether Brague is a Straussian, what the civilizational role of poverty, humility, and cultural inferiority complexes are, and whether Americans really are cultural cowboys, each get discussed in turn.


“Cows too…can easily be made into ideas”: An Interview with Roger Scruton

“Cows too…can easily be made into ideas”: An Interview with Roger Scruton

Interviewer: Diederik Boomsma
What distinguishes conservatism from classical liberalism?

The problem with classical liberalism is that it never pauses to examine what is involved in ‘not harming others’. Do I leave others unharmed when I destroy my capacity for personal relationships, through drug-taking, promiscuity, or porn addiction? Do I leave them unharmed when I stupefy myself with pop music? I have nothing against individualism, so long as it is recognized that the individual is created by a community and by the moral constraints that prevail in it. The individual is not the foundation of society but its most important by-product.


Read more...