Friday, August 28, 2015

New at Clarion

Featured

<b>What’s become of the peanut-eyed snowman?</b>

What’s become of the peanut-eyed snowman?

August 9, 2015  

by Alessio Zanelli
The sights, textures, scents and sounds of the world we encounter as children become parts of us, pegs on which memories are hung for a while – before they quietly fade and are lost. In this poem, at a familiar schoolyard after a lifetime away, they surface once more...

Articles / Essays

<b>The Polish Ideal</b>

The Polish Ideal

May 6, 2015  

G.K. Chesterton
In the 1790s, the once-great Polish Commonwealth had been carved up by the neighboring empires of Prussia, Austria, and Russia. But, in spite of the long century of repression that followed – a time when Siberia was known as the "Polish Golgotha" – the Poles' chivalric spirit and love of their homeland survived. In the 1920s, shortly after the victory of the newly independent Republic of Poland over Lenin's expansionist Soviet Union, G.K. Chesterton himself travelled to the country. And, filled as ever with the joy of discovering truths at the bottom of apparent paradoxes, he found poetry in their cavalry.

Interviews

“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

October 29, 2009  

Interview and translation by Diederik Boomsma & Yoram Stein We interview the French intellectual Rémi Brague, about his life and work. The question of whether and in what way the West is unique forms a large part of the interview. Whether one can sensibly speak of “three religions of the book”, whether Brague is a Straussian, what the civilizational role of poverty, humility, and cultural inferiority complexes are, and whether Americans really are cultural cowboys, each get discussed in turn.

Book Reviews

<b>Jonathan Franzen’s <i>The Kraus Project</i></b>

Jonathan Franzen’s The Kraus Project

April 19, 2015  

Marion Gabl
Now largely forgotten, Karl Kraus was one of the most incisive and provocative cultural commentators of early twentieth-century Vienna. He's also a literary hero of Jonathan Franzen, one of the most successful American novelists active today. In his ambitious latest book, Franzen sets out to recover the forgotten Kraus for contemporary readers. But his interest isn't simply historical: he also hopes to show that Kraus has a cure for the problems of our postmodern condition. Does he succeed? Marion Gabl reviews the effort.

Poetry

<b>Plato</b>

Plato

July 15, 2015  

Sir Henry James Sumner Maine
Today, Sir Henry is remembered as one of the nineteenth century's most important legal historians: his conception of contractual association as the distinguishing mark of Modernity remains an instructive lens through which to reflect on who we are and where we come from. But, at least in his undergraduate days at Pembroke College, Cambridge, he also proved himself to be both a poet and a Platonist of sorts; and one result was this tribute to the Master, which he submitted in 1843 in an (alas, unsuccessful) bid for the Chancellor's English Medal.

Fiction

A Dove Descending: Part III of III

A Dove Descending: Part III of III

January 8, 2013  

Roger Scruton The Clarion Review is proud to present the third and final installment of this novella by writer and philosopher Roger Scruton. Zoë's dreams of meeting her destiny on the streets of London are running aground fast. To whom will she turn? To Dr Leacock, the predatory postmodern professor who's always too ready to help? To Michael, the mysterious art student, who surely pours his angst into something worth living for? Back to her mother, whom she disgraced by her flight, and whom she still resents? Zoë takes her stand; will the world turn with her?

Featured Essays

<b>The Polish Ideal</b>

The Polish Ideal

G.K. Chesterton
In the 1790s, the once-great Polish Commonwealth had been carved up by the neighboring empires of Prussia, Austria, and Russia. But, in spite of the long century of repression that followed – a time when Siberia was known as the "Polish Golgotha" – the Poles' chivalric spirit and love of their homeland survived. In the 1920s, shortly after the victory of the newly independent Republic of Poland over Lenin's expansionist Soviet Union, G.K. Chesterton himself travelled to the country. And, filled as ever with the joy of discovering truths at the bottom of apparent paradoxes, he found poetry in their cavalry.
<b>Jonathan Franzen’s <i>The Kraus Project</i></b>

Jonathan Franzen’s The Kraus Project

Marion Gabl
Now largely forgotten, Karl Kraus was one of the most incisive and provocative cultural commentators of early twentieth-century Vienna. He's also a literary hero of Jonathan Franzen, one of the most successful American novelists active today. In his ambitious latest book, Franzen sets out to recover the forgotten Kraus for contemporary readers. But his interest isn't simply historical: he also hopes to show that Kraus has a cure for the problems of our postmodern condition. Does he succeed? Marion Gabl reviews the effort.
<b>Two Minds</b>

Two Minds

Wendell Berry
Inevitably, says farmer-poet Wendell Berry, we come to inhabit two worlds: the one that actually is, and the one we imagine. Navigating between them isn't easy – not least because, in nearly every one of us today, "two minds" are at war with each other over the privilege of steering our course.
Read more...

Featured Poetry

<b>Plato</b>

Plato

Sir Henry James Sumner Maine
Today, Sir Henry is remembered as one of the nineteenth century's most important legal historians: his conception of contractual association as the distinguishing mark of Modernity remains an instructive lens through which to reflect on who we are and where we come from. But, at least in his undergraduate days at Pembroke College, Cambridge, he also proved himself to be both a poet and a Platonist of sorts; and one result was this tribute to the Master, which he submitted in 1843 in an (alas, unsuccessful) bid for the Chancellor's English Medal.
<b>Calamity Again</b>

Calamity Again

Taras Shevchenko
The Ukrainians' ongoing struggle to save their troubled, post-Soviet civil society and to defend their sovereign land against Russian aggression has deep roots: although possessed of a national identity for centuries, they have enjoyed only few and fleeting periods of independence. In this brief but poignant poem, one of their greatest bards gives voice to his grief at yet another outbreak of violence in his beloved homeland.
Motel Mary Poppins

Motel Mary Poppins

Br. Benedict Joseph of the Cross
In More Tramps Abroad, Mark Twain wrote, “Every man is a moon, and has a dark side which he never shows to anybody.” For some, when an average weekend’s relative liberties do not suffice, Halloween is the perfect time to let the mask fall precisely by donning one. But in this poem All Hallows’ Eve is the occasion for a rather different kind of transfiguration.
Whisper

Whisper

Jeffrey Bilbro
A parody of Allen Ginsberg's Howl. In "Whisper" Mr. Bilbro breaks down some of the feelings of and about Generation ME. A thought-provoking piece that should be required reading in all freshman English classes.
Read more...

From the Archives

“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

Interview and translation by Diederik Boomsma & Yoram Stein We interview the French intellectual Rémi Brague, about his life and work. The question of whether and in what way the West is unique forms a large part of the interview. Whether one can sensibly speak of “three religions of the book”, whether Brague is a Straussian, what the civilizational role of poverty, humility, and cultural inferiority complexes are, and whether Americans really are cultural cowboys, each get discussed in turn.
“Cows too…can easily be made into ideas”: An Interview with Roger Scruton

“Cows too…can easily be made into ideas”: An Interview with Roger Scruton

Interviewer: Diederik Boomsma
What distinguishes conservatism from classical liberalism? The problem with classical liberalism is that it never pauses to examine what is involved in ‘not harming others’. Do I leave others unharmed when I destroy my capacity for personal relationships, through drug-taking, promiscuity, or porn addiction? Do I leave them unharmed when I stupefy myself with pop music? I have nothing against individualism, so long as it is recognized that the individual is created by a community and by the moral constraints that prevail in it. The individual is not the foundation of society but its most important by-product.
Read more...