Friday, August 26, 2016

New at Clarion

Featured

<p>The Prince and the Polis</p><pre></pre><i>A Conversation with Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein</i>

The Prince and the Polis

A Conversation with Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein

May 18, 2016  

Clarion Review Founding Editor Jonathan Price and philosopher Nathaniel Helms sat down with His Serene Highness Hans-Adam II, Prince of Liechtenstein at the Oxford Union to discuss localism, centralisation, and his hopes for democracy in the third millennium.

Articles / Essays

<b>A Space of Forbearance</b><pre></pre><i>Ethnicity and Architecture on the Danube River Delta</i>

A Space of Forbearance
Ethnicity and Architecture on the Danube River Delta

April 10, 2016  

Augustin Ioan

On the northwest coast of the Black Sea, beyond even where the Emperor Augustus banished Ovid, lies the Romanian town of Tulcea. Like many Romanian cities, it was a focal point for the confluence of a dizzying array of cultures: Slavic, Latin, Greek, Turkish, Jewish, Tatar, Armenian, and more. And, like cities everywhere, its social fabric was reflected and transmitted in its built environment. It was a remembered past and a lived present in stone and wood. Thirty years after the fall of the regime that “systematized” its urban core, one of the country's leading architects reflects on the cityscape that shaped his childhood in Tulcea and offers quiet hope for its future.

Interviews

<p>The Prince and the Polis</p><pre></pre><i>A Conversation with Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein</i>

The Prince and the Polis

A Conversation with Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein

May 18, 2016  

Clarion Review Founding Editor Jonathan Price and philosopher Nathaniel Helms sat down with His Serene Highness Hans-Adam II, Prince of Liechtenstein at the Oxford Union to discuss localism, centralisation, and his hopes for democracy in the third millennium.

Book Reviews

<b>Jonathan Franzen’s <i>The Kraus Project</i></b>

Jonathan Franzen’s The Kraus Project

April 19, 2015  

Marion Gabl

Now largely forgotten, Karl Kraus was one of the most incisive and provocative cultural commentators of early twentieth-century Vienna. He's also a literary hero of Jonathan Franzen, one of the most successful American novelists active today. In his ambitious latest book, Franzen sets out to recover the forgotten Kraus for contemporary readers. But his interest isn't simply historical: he also hopes to show that Kraus has a cure for the problems of our postmodern condition. Does he succeed? Marion Gabl reviews the effort.

Poetry

<b>Concert at Sunrise House</b>

Concert at Sunrise House

May 2, 2016  

Len Krisak

The men and women who came of age during the 1930s and 1940s — if they survived them — lived through some of the most spectacular and cataclysmic upheavals that human history has known. In this new poem, Len Krisak offers us a glimpse of their sunset years, a quiet tribute tinged with aching at the passage of time, the changing of the guard, and the frailty of the bond that joins the generations.

Fiction

A Dove Descending: Part III of III

A Dove Descending: Part III of III

January 8, 2013  

Roger Scruton The Clarion Review is proud to present the third and final installment of this novella by writer and philosopher Roger Scruton. Zoë's dreams of meeting her destiny on the streets of London are running aground fast. To whom will she turn? To Dr Leacock, the predatory postmodern professor who's always too ready to help? To Michael, the mysterious art student, who surely pours his angst into something worth living for? Back to her mother, whom she disgraced by her flight, and whom she still resents? Zoë takes her stand; will the world turn with her?

Featured Essays

<b>A Space of Forbearance</b><pre></pre><i>Ethnicity and Architecture on the Danube River Delta</i>

A Space of Forbearance
Ethnicity and Architecture on the Danube River Delta

Augustin Ioan

On the northwest coast of the Black Sea, beyond even where the Emperor Augustus banished Ovid, lies the Romanian town of Tulcea. Like many Romanian cities, it was a focal point for the confluence of a dizzying array of cultures: Slavic, Latin, Greek, Turkish, Jewish, Tatar, Armenian, and more. And, like cities everywhere, its social fabric was reflected and transmitted in its built environment. It was a remembered past and a lived present in stone and wood. Thirty years after the fall of the regime that “systematized” its urban core, one of the country's leading architects reflects on the cityscape that shaped his childhood in Tulcea and offers quiet hope for its future.


<b>The Resurrection of the Body</b>

The Resurrection of the Body

John Henry Newman

The Christian religion has at its center the Resurrection of the Christ, without which, St. Paul says, the faith is in vain, and through which we, too, are to rise. To what sort of life? It is not that of an abstracted, disembodied spirit, but that of an entire person, body and soul, whole again, and transfigured. In this sermon from his days as Vicar of St. Mary's, Oxford, preaching to a society drawn to materialism on the one hand and 'angelism' on the other, John Henry Newman meditates on Christ's invocation of the burning bush as a sign that we – our bodies included – "die but to appearance", a sign of the incarnate eternity that awaits us on the far side of the grave.


<b>If Love Has Won, Has Marriage Lost? <br>An Orthodox Response to <i>Obergefell v. Hodges</i></b>

If Love Has Won, Has Marriage Lost?
An Orthodox Response to Obergefell v. Hodges

Vigen Guroian

Last summer, the United States Supreme Court ruled that marriage is a constitutional right for all citizens, and that laws banning same-sex marriage are unconstitutional. What does this mean for the Church? Orthodox theologian Vigen Guroian argues for a rediscovery of the centrality of the Eucharist in Christian matrimony – and for the Church's immediate disengagement from the civil marriage business.


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Featured Poetry

<b>Concert at Sunrise House</b>

Concert at Sunrise House

Len Krisak

The men and women who came of age during the 1930s and 1940s — if they survived them — lived through some of the most spectacular and cataclysmic upheavals that human history has known. In this new poem, Len Krisak offers us a glimpse of their sunset years, a quiet tribute tinged with aching at the passage of time, the changing of the guard, and the frailty of the bond that joins the generations.


<b>The Stations of the Cross</b>

The Stations of the Cross

James Matthew Wilson and Daniel Mitsui

In this fourteen-part cycle, which is being released serially, Wilson meditates on the mystery of the Cross and the way that leads to it. As the cycle unfolds, mundane time is caught up in the divine economy and drawn, step by step, to the summit of "Skull Hill". Paired with each poem is a beautiful, hand-drawn Station by artist Daniel Mitsui, whose work is a faithful participation in the tradition of Christian iconography as a sacred discipline and an act of prayer, in a revivified Western idiom. It is an honor to present the work of these two contemporary practitioners of classical arts alongside each other.


<b>What’s become of the peanut-eyed snowman?</b>

What’s become of the peanut-eyed snowman?

Alessio Zanelli

The sights, textures, scents and sounds of the world we encounter as children become parts of us, pegs on which memories are hung for a while – before they quietly fade and are lost. In this poem, at a familiar schoolyard after a lifetime away, they surface once more...


<b>Plato</b>

Plato

Sir Henry James Sumner Maine

Today, Sir Henry is remembered as one of the nineteenth century's most important legal historians: his conception of contractual association as the distinguishing mark of Modernity remains an instructive lens through which to reflect on who we are and where we come from. But, at least in his undergraduate days at Pembroke College, Cambridge, he also proved himself to be both a poet and a Platonist of sorts; and one result was this tribute to the Master, which he submitted in 1843 in an (alas, unsuccessful) bid for the Chancellor's English Medal.


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From the Archives

“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

“Yellow Ants,” Fundamentalists, and Cowboys – An interview with Rémi Brague

Interview and translation by Diederik Boomsma & Yoram Stein

We interview the French intellectual Rémi Brague about his life and work. The question of whether and in what way the West is unique figures centrally in our discussion. Whether one can sensibly speak of “three religions of the book”, whether Brague is a Straussian, what the civilisational roles of poverty, humility, and cultural inferiority complexes may be, and whether Americans really are cultural cowboys, are also each discussed in turn.


“Cows too…can easily be made into ideas”: An Interview with Roger Scruton

“Cows too…can easily be made into ideas”: An Interview with Roger Scruton

Interview by Diederik Boomsma

What distinguishes conservatism from classical liberalism?

The problem with classical liberalism is that it never pauses to examine what is involved in ‘not harming others’. Do I leave others unharmed when I destroy my capacity for personal relationships, through drug-taking, promiscuity, or porn addiction? Do I leave them unharmed when I stupefy myself with pop music? I have nothing against individualism, so long as it is recognized that the individual is created by a community and by the moral constraints that prevail in it. The individual is not the foundation of society but its most important by-product.


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